Mindful or Suicidal: Recommendations for Improved Mental Health among Police Officers

Mindful or suicidal

Ewa K. Zielinska, University of New Haven

Executive Summary 

Despite multiple national initiatives, the suicide rate among police officers remains constant and higher than line of duty deaths. Recent research identifies mindfulness techniques as an effective way to improve mental health, including the risk factors of depression and suicide. While a significant portion of resources and funding are allocated to ensure the safety and physical fitness of officers, including firearms training and physical fitness programs, there is a limited number of holistic programs that ensure officers’ mental health wellness. Based on current research and pioneer initiatives, this document explores the following question: What role can mindfulness practices play in reducing the risk of suicide among police officers? The document concludes with recommendations for law enforcement agencies, including implementation of evidence-based mindfulness practices and cultivation a pro-wellness work etiquette. 

Continue reading about improving police officers' mental health Mindful or Suicidal: Recommendations for Improved Mental Health among Police Officers

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The EBP Quarterly - 2019 - Volume 4, Number 2

  • Tackling juvenile delinquency

    Tackle the Root Causes of Juvenile Delinquency: Family-Based Early Intervention

    Tianyin Yu, University of New Haven Executive Summary Early onset Read More
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Editor: David L. Myers, PhD, University of New Haven

Publisher: Joyfields Institute

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Photos from photographers on Unsplash

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Body-Worn Cameras in State Correctional Agencies

Police and body cams

Kristi L. Greenberg, University of New Haven

Executive Summary

The purpose of this report is to inform and advise state correctional agencies about the known use of body worn cameras (BWCs) and how they can be utilized to address some of the major problems that are faced within correctional settings. Discussions of what is known about the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), use of force, and staff burnout are offered, along with consideration of policing research on the use of BWCs, its advantages and disadvantages, and how state correctional agencies can benefit. Policy recommendations are offered that include a phased roll out of BWCs in pilot facilities, with monitoring and evaluation plans, in conjunction with enhanced training.

Continue reading about the use of body-worn cameras in state correctional agencies Body-Worn Cameras in State Correctional Agencies

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EB Professionals Monthly - August, 2019

Are you a Veteran in crisis or concerned about one? 

The VA offers same day services in Primary Care and Mental Health at 172 VA Medical Centers nationwide. Use it NOW - Access Make the Connection Resource LocatorTalk with other Veterans online at RallyPointCall the Veterans Crisis Line (1-800-273-8255 and press 1, Chat online, or Send Text to 838255.

NEW ARTICLES

Read more: EB Professionals Monthly - August, 2019

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EB Professionals Monthly - July, 2019

Read more: EB Professionals Monthly - July, 2019

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EBP Society and Joyfields Institute To Hold Fall Conference in Las Vegas

For Immediate Release

ATLANTA, Georgia, July 1 — The EBP Society and Joyfields Institute jointly plan a Las Vegas Conference for human, social and justice services personnel. Joyfields will hold this 13th Annual Fall "PATHWAYS" Conference and Workshops on October 30 - November 1, 2019 for evidence-based professionals seeking to grow and earn accredited learning hours, and enhance their career by becoming Certified EB Professionals and Leaders. The event, which will be held at the fabulous Luxor Hotel Las Vegas, will help attendees learn proven approaches for producing sustainable behavioral change and uncommon client success.

Read more: EBP Society and Joyfields Institute To Hold Fall Conference in Las Vegas

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EB Professionals Monthly - June, 2019

Read more: EB Professionals Monthly - June, 2019

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Connecticut Project Safe Neighborhoods 2016: A Youth Opportunity Initiative

Campus Sexual Assaults

Sara R. Jeffries, M.A.
David L. Myers, Ph.D.
Anne Kringen, Ph.D.
University of New Haven

Ronald W. Schack, Ph.D.
The Charter Oak Group

Acknowledgements: Connecticut Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) was organized around a task force, consisting of agencies from both New Haven and Bridgeport, to support crime prevention and gun violence reduction efforts for at-risk youth in inner cities. The Project Safe Neighborhood initiative would not have been successful without the cooperation of the task force members and their representatives:

• Connecticut Board of Education
• Bullard-Havens Technical High School
• Connecticut Business and Industry Association
• Eli Whitney Technical High School
• Integrated Wellness Group
• New Haven Office of the Mayor
• The Charter Oak Group
• The Justice Education Center, Inc. (TJEC)
• Researchers at University of New Haven
• U.S. Attorney’s Office
• Workforce Development Board in Bridgeport
• Youth STAT Youth Services Program
• Veterans Empowering Teens Through Support (or VETTS)
• Clinical Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Staff at Fairfield University
• Court Support Services Division of the Judicial Branch


Note: This project was supported by Grant No. 2016-GP-BX-0012 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Read more: Connecticut Project Safe Neighborhoods 2016: A Youth Opportunity Initiative

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A Review of “Use of Research Evidence by Criminal Justice Professionals”

human-trafficking

Timothy Daty, University of New Haven 

This article previously appeared in ACJS Today. Permission was granted to republish it here.

In the recent issue of Justice Policy Journal, Johnson and colleagues explore the use of research evidence by criminal justice professionals. In particular, the researchers discuss the underutilization of research evidence into policies and practices. Evidence-based practices serve an important role in the development and continued success of criminal justice policies and practices. Through use of research evidence, the criminal justice system can better understand the impact of various programs and develop targeted strategies. In the absence of these evidence-based practices, strategies are at a much higher risk of failing or even worsening a current situation. For criminal justice practitioners, successfully integrating this research into policy decisions can be accomplished in variety of ways. In this article, the authors provide a thorough review of current practices and describe different ways of improving evidence-based practices. To do so, three core issues are addressed in this article: the research-practice gap in the criminal justice system, strategies for increasing the use of research evidence in decision-making, and suggestions for future research.

Read more: A Review of “Use of Research Evidence by Criminal Justice Professionals”

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