Meet The San Diego Faculty

Joyfields Institute

MEET THE SAN DIEGO

 

FACULTY

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June Fisher
Joyce Grangent
John Keene
Mark Lowis
Sobem Nwoko
Focused On Evidence-Based "PATHWAYS" for

CASE MANAGEMENT, CARE COORDINATION & SUPERVISION

3 Days, 6 Engagement Tracks, 21 Sessions...

STARTS

NOVEMBER 29, 2017

  • Full-Day "A-Z" Workshop!
  • Motivation & Individual Engagement Track
  • Youth, Family & Community Engagement Track
  • Housing & Jobs' Systems & Supports Engagement Track
  • Trauma & Practice Track
  • Intensive Case & In-Community Supervision Track
  • Practitioner Track
  • Case Study & Implementation Planning
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FREE Short Webcasts for YOU - 4-Step Pathway to YOUR Personal Success!

Breakthrough NOW! Its Simpler Than We Make It...

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In our work we are so caught up trying to learn how we can help clients we serve succeed. Rightfully so.

For our lives, we also want to succeed.

How much time do you spend working on your own success?

Do you even know what success looks like? Do you know what to do?

Even if you know, do you do it? Do you get going on it? Do you fall short? Are you stuck?

Join me for this short webinar and learn how to tackle this "stuckness" once and for all!

If you are successful, chances are you will be happy with yourself and what you are doing.

Consequently, you will likely do an even better job at your work and other areas of your life.

Join me this Friday at 1 PM EST

 

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What Does It Mean to Become a Certified Evidence Based Practitioner (CEBP) Or, Giving Up Your “Guy in a Diner” Card

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What Does It Mean to Become a Certified Evidence Based Practitioner (CEBP) Or,

Giving Up Your “Guy in a Diner” Card

Mark M. Lowis, LMSW, MINT, CEBP, Joyfields Institute for Evidence-Based Professionals

If you get the chance to go to your local family style restaurant and observe, you will notice there is always one table where a few distinguished men of retirement age (a recent accomplishment for me) sit together and visit.  Their conversation often turns to politics, social problems, world affairs, and family members worthy of discussion.  In other words, they are using their collective experiences, intuition and opinions to solve the problems of the universe.  Often, they include science in their conversation, which sounds a bit like this: “And that’s proved!” Or, “Everyone knows that.”  “Scientists have proven that!” “It happened to my cousin!”  “I read it in the paper!”  All of course are intended to give weight to their observations and ideas.  Practitioners most resemble a guy in a diner when they operate in clinically driven situations from their opinion, intuition or assumptions.  Like the guy in a diner, the clinical examination and consideration of deeper issues, and the corresponding approach or intervention, cannot be effectively developed.  The end result is that the guy in a diner belief, which is rarely helpful and may contribute to treatment failures, informs the practitioner’s future with that person. 

Read more: What Does It Mean to Become a Certified Evidence Based Practitioner (CEBP) Or, Giving Up Your “Guy...

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Police Use of Force Policy and Excessive Force

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Evin Carmack, University of New Haven

This paper seeks to examine use of force policy and its impact on instances of excessive force.  Use of force policy has been an ongoing national issue, as high-profile cases of officer-involved shootings are being increasingly reported.  As police departments have become more formalized, so have their rules and regulations.  Use of force policy was seen as a strategy to regulate the amount of force officers used when attempting to subdue an unwilling subject.  The research on this subject has been mixed and has shown some training techniques to be more effective than others.  Research findings also suggest that it is the encounter characteristics of the interaction that are most likely correlated with use of force decisions.  Therefore, future research should focus on encounter characteristics and on training officers in dealing with those different encounter characteristics.

Read more: Police Use of Force Policy and Excessive Force

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The Efficacy of Drug Courts

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Meredith Emigh, University of New Haven

Drug courts were designed to divert drug-involved offenders with less serious charges into treatment instead of prison. It is estimated that 78% of property crimes and 77% of public order offenses are related to drug or alcohol abuse, which costs the United States $74 billion a year (CASA, 2010). This includes the cost of police, court, prison, probation and parole services. Substance-involved offenders are more likely to recidivate than their sober peers (CASA, 2010). Proponents of the drug court model claim that it prevents recidivism while also saving a considerable amount of money. However, evaluation research is necessary to determine whether drug courts are truly effective.

There have been many evaluation studies of drug courts in the last two decades, most of which suggest that drug courts are at least somewhat effective. Unfortunately, these studies relied on methodology that does not provide the most scientifically rigorous results, including quasi-experimental and retrospective designs. This paper will review the current research on drug court effectiveness to determine whether these courts meet the dual goals of saving money while lowering rates of recidivism and substance use.

Continue reading about the effectiveness of drug courtsThe Efficacy of Drug Courts

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Deinstitutionalization, Mental Health, and Criminal Populations: How the Process of Deinstitutionalization Affected Current Incarceration Rates of the Mentally Ill

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Sherry Siller, University of New Haven
 
Formally, deinstitutionalization began on a large scale in the early 1950s, at a time when the number of institutionalized people was at a record high of 559,000 (Deas-Nesmith, McLeod-Bryant, & Carolina, 1992).  As a policy, deinstitutionalization mandated a shift in the caring of individuals with mental illness from state run environments to the community. The goal of deinstitutionalization was the large-scale elimination of the long-term care, state-run, residential facilities for the mentally ill (Pow, Baumeister, Hawkins, Cohen, & Garand, 2015). Ultimately, this goal can be broken down into several components: (1) the release of individuals from psychiatric hospitals who are capable of caring for themselves with medication; (2) the transfer of mentally ill individuals to community based care centers, and the diversion of new admissions to alternative, locally run facilities; (3) the development of specialized services to monitor and care for, as needed, the noninstitutionalized (outpatient) mentally ill population; and (4) to reduce the costs associated with long-term institutionalization (Lamb & Bachrach, 2001; Sutherland, 2015).
 
Deinstitutionalization as a whole consists of the sum of its parts, meaning it is not just one specific action that caused the mass decline in state run psychiatric facilities for the mentally ill, but several actions and policy changes occurring in roughly the same time interval. Furthermore, its goals were achieved through multiple initiatives, at both macro and micro levels. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine this multifaceted approach toward reducing the number of long term mentally ill cared for by the states. It also will examine how deinstitutionalization has impacted the current rates of mental illness and the current initiatives aimed at reducing the number of mentally ill incarcerated.

Continue reading about deinstitutionalization in the criminal justice systemDeinstitutionalization, Mental Health, and Criminal Populations: How the Process of...

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The EBP Quarterly - Volume 2, Number 2

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    What Does It Mean to Become a Certified Evidence Based Practitioner (CEBP) Or, Giving Up Your “Guy in a Diner” Card

    What Does It Mean to Become a Certified Evidence Based Read More
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Editor: David L. Myers, PhD, University of New Haven

Photos by Samuel ZellerAhmed DouibiScott Webb & Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

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Fall 2017 Evidence-Based "PATHWAYS" Series registration now open - Register early and save!

Evidence-Based "PATHWAYS" for...

Case & Care Management, Coordination, & Supervision

Nov. 29 - Dec. 1, 2017
San Diego, CA, USA

Secure your spot and save $150 on Fall 2017 Evidence-Based "Pathways" Series

Proven methods have become mainstream! Because you are a member of the evidence-based community, we want you to be FIRST to Lock in your spot for this "Pathways" Series.

If you would like to enhance and strengthen efforts you are already making, are not confident your process is proven for managing, coordinating and supervising cases in your care, join us this November in the great city of San Diego, and learn how, along with other colleagues, practitioners, and experts who are committed to proven methods.

Register by THIS Friday, August 25, at 5 p.m. EST, and get in for 15% LESS! You save as much as $150 just by reserving your slot now.

Use Promo code: PATHWAYS10

Don't let your colleagues & friends miss out

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Register Now
 
Need more convincing to become Evidence-Based? Consider these 5.5 reasons

Reason #1. You're nimble, and quick - very quick!
Reason #2. Your clients successfully work their world, and thrive
Reason #3. The professional in you, and your team shows up, is "renewed", and genuinely good at what you do
Reason #4. You and your agency attract customers, funders and stakeholders
Reason #5. You put on legal "armors" inherent with your commitment to proven approaches
Reason #5.5. Oh, by the way, you make money, lots of it, you save money, you use resources well, and have less stress! How about that!

 

 

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How to produce uncommon client success - will you join us near you?

Motivational Interviewing (MI): Core Skills for Durable Behavioral Change

The "must-have" method in your practice toolkit

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Incoming HHS Secretary Price has advocated that spending be focused on "Evidence-Based Treatments" saying, “What we need to do is identify the things that are working and then fund those things that are working." MI is one such "thing" that is working.

Join us at a location near you for this comprehensive 2-Day Core Skills training helping clients successfully resolve change issues. Others are stepping up, will you?

Aug. 24-25, 2017   |   Billings, MT
Aug. 29-30,2017     Fargo, ND
Sept. 7-8, 2017   |   Burlington, VT
Sept. 12-13, 2017   |   Des Moines, IA
Sept. 14-15, 2017   |   Boise, ID
Sept. 21-22, 2017   |   Wilmington, DE
Sept. 28-29, 2017   |   Tulsa, OK
Oct. 5-6, 2017   |   Memphis, TN
Oct. 12-13, 2017   |   Birmingham, AL
Oct. 19-20, 2017   |   Louisville, KY 

 

RESERVE YOUR SLOT NOW   CALL 770-409-8780

Space is limited. Book your team* now. 

* Team attendance highly encouraged. Group discounts with 2 or more attending as a team

Participants each receive own copy of ebook; "Motivational Interviewing: Core Skills for Durable Change", By premier MI teacher and facilitator, Mark Lowis, LMSW, MINT

** To bring this program to your location, please use enter detail on this quote request form >>

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Monthly for Evidence-Based Professionals

Welcome! This issue features your collection of relevant articles, webcasts, grant resources, and our upcoming events.

 - Pathways for agency & personal change event. Starts in 10-Days! "Become an Evidence-Based Human & Justice Professional & Organization" | Aug. 16-18, 2017 | Atlanta, GA. (Book seats now)

 - By request, Joyfields' "MI Training" hits the road! - Billings, MT; Fargo, ND; Des Moines, IA; Boise, ID; Burlington, VT, and more!! (Book seats near you)

Articles & Stories

Evidence-Based Human & Justice Services:

Read more: Monthly for Evidence-Based Professionals

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